Mission Capistrano

The Story of Misión San Juan Capistrano.

The year was 1731. The Mission, which had been previously known in East Texas as Mission San José de los Nazonis, was re-located. Its new home was on the eastern bank of the San Antonio River.

Because of its proximity to rich soil and pasturelands, San Juan became known as a reliable source of quality agricultural products. The mission’s orchards and gardens, which were outside the walls, produced peaches, melons, pumpkins, grapes, and peppers. And irrigated fields made it possible to grow corn, beans, sweet potatoes, squash, and even sugar cane. In 1762, Mission San Juan’s herds were reported to include 3,500 sheep and goats, 1,000 cattle, and 100 horses.

But in spite of this farming success, the mission did not advance as quickly as the others did. There were two reasons for that. It was frequently under attack by hostile tribes. And while the land was excellent, there was simply not enough of it to raise the amount of food needed to meet what was required.

The church at Mission San Juan is simple, smooth and un-sculpted, especially when compared to the churches of the other missions. But it is still a rare treasure from another time. And it is deeply beloved today by the community of Berg’s Mill, which it still serves. With your help, we can restore it to what it was in its best days. And preserve it for the future.

The administrator for Misión San Juan Capistrano is Rev. James G. Galvin
9101 Graf Road
San Antonio, Texas 78214
210-534-3161


Mass Schedule

Saturday
5:00 PM (in English)

Sunday
9AM (in English)
10:45 AM (Bilingual)

Holy Day
6:00 PM (in English)


Misión San Juan Capistrano Photo Gallery

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